Easing into exercise

Easing into exercise

Even a brief, structured exercise can improve your heart health – and it’s never too late to start.

Are you one of those people who usually work, work, and care for spouses, grandchildren, or pets, usually during homework and backyard days? One of the reasons for living a busy and active life is that people think they just don’t have to spend time to exercise, said program director at the Cardiac Women’s Heart and Rehabilitation Rehabilitation Program in Harrisburg, Mass, Texas.

“People say I am very active, and I always travel,” she said. It’s good to be physically active, he tells them. But regular moderate exercise – ideally at least 30 minutes a day – can reduce your blood pressure and many other cardiovascular risk factors. Even if you have never received formal training, getting started in the second half of life can still make a difference (see “Exercise: Getting Started After 60 Can Help”).

Exercise: Getting started after 60 can also help

Exercise

When people get older, people exercise less. But combating this trend can reduce According to a study published last November in the European Journal of Cardiology, the risk of heart disease and stroke is high. Researchers analyzed more than 1.1 million people in South Korea, 60 years of age or older, without heart disease. All of them underwent two health checks between 2009 and 2012 and were followed up by the end of 2016.

About two-thirds of the participants were physically disabled at both screenings. But those who started exercising one to two times per week with a second screening were 5% less likely to experience an incidence of heart attack or stroke during follow-up than in adults. And when people start exercising three to four times a week, the risk of heart problems decreases by 11%.

Find a match

Find a match

Find exercises you have that increment your response rate, whether it’s walking, swimming, aerobics, or dancing. Using sports equipment such as an elliptical machine or stationary bike can be a great option, especially when the weather is bad. People with physical impairments (such as lower Hip disorder or common disorder) may need to try complex options to find a form of activity that does not hurt.

And don’t stress yourself too much. The old saying “without pain, without consequences” is completely false, said Cardiovascular Nurse Bosquet. You don’t need sweat; You just need to increase your heart rate more than usual. See “Exercise Attempts” to describe how hard you need to work, which varies depending on your level of fitness.

Try exercise

Try exercise

When you are just getting started, aim for lightweight to moderate intensity, whether you are walking, cycling, or swimming. Once you get into the attitude of exercising daily, you can gradually increase your level of effort.

  • Intensity: How does it feel?
  • Light effort: breathe easily; You can sing
  • Light to moderate: efforts breathing becomes more visible; You can speak whole sentences
  • Moderate: effort breathing hard; You can speak with full sentences, but more breathing is required
  • Moderate to strong: effort slightly out of breath; You can speak in phrases

Low and slow start

Low and slow start

Lauren Mallett, a physical therapist and cardiopulmonary specialist at Basquiat, said that people who are not too active could feel half an hour full of exercise. “If you are really new to exercising, just exercise for five to 10 minutes. Try to increase it to two to three minutes every two sessions.” you can also split training into two 15-minute sessions, or exercise three to 10 minutes a day. “You will not have to be as patient as possible, but you will still reduce the risk of heart disease,” said Millett.

When people come for cardiac rehabilitation, their blood pressure is measured repeatedly. If reading is high when they first arrive, it is less than 10 minutes after completing the exercise. Direct positive feedback can be very helpful, Millett said. People who suffer from pre-diabetes or diabetes often see similar benefits by lowering their blood sugar levels after exercise.

Other proven benefits of cardiovascular exercise include reducing inflammation and preventing the formation of dangerous blood clots. For additional information and tips, see Getting Started with the Harvard Special Health Report Report (www.dealingwithhealth.com/).

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